Saturday, 29 December 2018

Quiet by Susan Cain

At a teaching conference a few months ago, I was in the initial phases of formulating the questions and challenges I wanted to take on this year. I knew I wanted my focus to be somehow connected to oral communication.  As a second language teacher, I spend a good part of my day encouraging people to speak. To take risks. To make mistakes in front of their peers. For my students, I recognize that this is not easy and it is not for everyone. So, how do we do it anyways?

One of the other participants told me I'd probably be interested in reading Quiet by Susan Cain. This book describes what life is like for introverts and how we can harness the power of those who aren't often the loudest speakers in the room.


I consider myself a velocireader, so I'm always happy to take on new book recommendations. I immediately borrowed a copy from a co-worker and started reading.

Quiet really has me asking myself what speaking fluidly means and has shifted my perspective. Speaking slowly doesn't mean that a student is not speaking fluidly. Additionally, the medium is not always the message. If the message is thoughtful, there is room in second-language education to acknowledge this, even if it is "easier" to evaluate errors that are right and wrong. And my students who are fluent and don't speak extensively in class are still fluent. As I enter report card season, this is something I am keeping in my mind much more than I ever have before.

Another interesting point is that the rise of social media and the Internet has given introverts a "voice", especially with writing. My question is, "How can I transfer this to oral communication?" Flipgrid is a start.

Being mindful of seating was something else that I had never thought of before. Don't seat quiet students in "high-traffic or high-interaction" areas. It will increase anxiety, decrease concentration, and they won't actually speak more.

And finally, never underestimate the power of empathy. I'd like to find more opportunities to check in with my introverted students before presentations. To encourage them. To tell them that I also get nervous, but it does get easier with time. I loved reading how we should teach our students the importance of rehearsal and practice. This is a concept I've been hammering home with my students more recently, and it's validating to read that I'm on the right track with this one.

I'd definitely say that Quiet is a must-read for second-language teachers. It certainly gave me quite a bit to think about!

xo
Jenn

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