Tuesday, 10 September 2019

Down Too Deep by J. Daniels - Book Review



I love a good love story, and Down Too Deep by J. Daniels is one of my favourite romances of the year. It is book #4 in the Dirty Deeds series, but Down Too Deep can be read as a standalone. In fact, this is my first book by the author.

Nathan Bell lost his wife suddenly a few months after the birth of their daughter, Marley. Overcome with grief and hiding behind his work, Nathan's parents become the primary caregivers for his daughter. When they force him to seek other childcare options, he has no idea what he's going to do. Until single mom, Jenna Savage, offers to care for Marley for the summer. She already has her own twins, and she's happy to help Nathan out by watching Marley as well. Jenna doesn't simply watch Marley for Nathan, she helps him learn about his daughter and rebuild their relationship.

Cue the sparks and steam ;)

Jenna, Nathan, and all three of their children are heartfelt characters who you will love. There are humorous moments in this story, and, if you are a parent, you will totally relate to how tricky it can be to find intimate moments with your partner with little ones under your feet!

Nathan getting to know Marley after basically ignoring her for the first two years of her life was completely adorable. My heart filled with joy every time he made a new connection with her, and I loved watching their relationship grow just as much as I loved the relationship between Nathan and Jenna.

Down Too Deep is absolutely a sexy romance novel; however, there is a lot of substance here as well. This book deals with grief, guilt, forgiveness, post-partum depression, and suicide. To me, a story with deep meaning is what puts some romances above the rest.

Down Too Deep is available October 8th from your favourite bookseller. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did! I can't wait to go back and read the rest of the books in this series.

xo
Jenn

Disclaimer - I received a complementary copy of this book from HBG Canada. All thoughts and opinions are entirely my own.

Friday, 30 August 2019

The Bride Test by Helen Hoang - Book Review


The Bride Test is the latest release from Helen Hoang. I absolutely adored her debut, The Kiss Quotient (you can read me gushing about it here), and I knew I was in for a treat when I picked up her next book.

In this novel, we follow the story of Esme and Khai. Khai is autistic and believes that he is incapable of loving others. While Esme initially thinks that participating in a quasi-arranged marriage with Khai may solve all of her problems, she finds herself truly falling in love. As they get to know each other, Esme longs to convince Khai that there is more than one way to love.

This book was exactly what I had hoped it would be. Sweet, sexy, and heartwarming. Khai was a loveable character, and I could picture him easily in my mind as I was reading. Watching Khai be romantic, while having absolutely no idea that he is doing so, is my favourite part of this book.

Esme shines so much in this story, it's hard to believe she almost wasn't the protagonist! (Be sure to read the author's note at the end for the full story.) With only a few options in front of her, Esme stands up for herself and her values, even if that means not always choosing the path that seems easy. I really admired this about her.

While The Kiss Quotient may still be my favourite Helen Hoang book so far, The Bride Test is an excellent follow up, and it looks like Quan's story (The Heart Principle) is coming in 2020!

xo
Jenn

Disclaimer - I received a complementary copy of The Bride Test from Penguin Random House Canada to review. All thoughts and opinions are entirely my own. 

Tuesday, 20 August 2019

Well-Read Black Girl by Glory Edim - Book Review



Seeing yourself in a book is such a gift. The moment you read a passage and instantly feel validated or less alone is powerful. More than once, I've reread sentences, paragraphs, and even whole pages because the author was able to put into words exactly how I felt. However, this feeling doesn't come around with the same frequency for everyone.

Well-Read Black Girl is an essay collection of Black women writers reflecting on how they found themselves in literature, how certain pieces of work guided them through childhood and adolescence, and how the words of others inspired them to write as well. It was born from Glory Edim who created the @wellreadblackgirl community on Instagram.

Well-Read Black Girl is small but mighty. I was introduced to so many authors, playwrights, poets, and titles I'd never heard of before. My formative years were vastly different than the women in this book, so reading this collection for me was eye-opening and reminded me how reading can be a powerful act of empathy to learn about others.

As an educator, I firmly believe that it is important for both children and adults to be able to connect with the texts they are reading, and this essay collection reaffirms that we need to ensure that young readers have a wide-range of books at their fingertips. You never know which book is going to connect with which reader, and it is important for them to read about and reflect upon the experiences of others, as well.

Highly recommend!
xo
Jenn

Disclaimer - I received a complementary copy of this book courtesy of Penguin Random House Canada for review purposes. All thoughts and opinions are entirely my own.

Sunday, 11 August 2019

The Bookshop on the Shore by Jenny Colgan - Book Review


Jenny Colgan is a go to for charming, heartwarming stories. I enjoyed The Bookshop on the Corner when it came out a few years ago, and dare I say I loved this one even more?

In The Bookshop on the Shore, you'll see some familiar faces from The Bookshop on the Corner (Nina, Lennox, and Surinder); however, this is a story about Zoe. Zoe is a single mom, struggling to make ends meet in London, England. When presented with the opportunity to move to Scotland and help out with Nina's travelling bookstore during the day, as well as work as a nanny in the evenings, she jumps at this opportunity. However, when she and her son Hari move into the old, majestic-but-falling-apart home where she will work, she realizes that she has her work cut out for her. Their mother disappeared, and they live with their father, who has no idea how to best manage their out of control behaviours. Additionally, she just doesn't have the same knack for selling books as Nina does.

That is the backdrop for a delightful story about the value of books. It's about how we find ourselves in books, about how books can protect us, and maybe even how books can help us heal.

Without spoiling anything, The Bookshop on the Shore has a lot to say about mental health, and especially children's mental health. I love that. I know there are challenges presented in this book that are very real dilemmas for many parents, and I think the messages delivered are important and wise.

The romance in this book is quite light, which I felt matched the story well. I was happy for the main focus to be elsewhere.

The Bookshop on the Shore is already available, and I highly recommend you pick up a copy at your favourite bookstore or library!

xo
Jenn

Disclaimer - I received a complementary copy of this novel from Harper Collins Canada. All thoughts and opinions are entirely my own.

Sunday, 4 August 2019

The Chocolate Maker's Wife by Karen Brooks - Book Review




The Chocolate Maker's Wife is the newest novel from Karen Brooks. Rosamund is sold into a sudden marriage by her mother and stepfather. Through this bargain, she is able to leave her abusive home, but what awaits her next? While she tries to navigate her new role as Lady Blithman, she is also given the opportunity to learn and work in her husband's new and exclusive chocolate house. However, she is quickly enmeshed into the Blithman family drama. Set in 1660s London, England, Rosamund is not only fighting for her future, but also her life.

I had such high hopes for this one, but The Chocolate Maker's Wife left me feeling conflicted. I liked it, but I didn't love it, and some things I didn't like at all.

What I liked:
  • I loved learning about the history of chocolate.
  • I always enjoy novels that have a romantic thread woven into the story.
  • There are some timely viewpoints in here on religious tolerance, race, and the role of women.
  • For me, what truly rescues this book is its historical setting. The second half of the 1600s was a tumultuous time in London as it overcomes the plague and the Great Fire, and it was interesting to read a novel set during these catastrophic events.

What I didn't like so much:

  • I wasn't overly in love with any of the characters.
  • The writing. Mark Twain has a great quote, "Don't use a five-dollar word when a fifty-cent word will do." and I think the author could have used that advice on multiple occasions in this book. I understand that part of it is that language evolves over time, but there were many phrases where the word choice felt distracting, unnecessary, and, at times, jarring, rather than authentic.

If you think the writing wouldn't bother you, then I'd say this is a book to pick up at the library rather than purchase to keep. It's available later this month.

But that cover and title though...😍😍

xo
Jenn

Disclaimer - I received a complementary copy of this book courtesy of Harper Collins Canada for review purposes. All thoughts and opinions are entirely my own.

Monday, 29 July 2019

The Bromance Book Club by Lyssa Kay Adams - Book Review



It's official. Romances about couples who are already married but working through their crap are my new favourite.

Whitney at @theunreadshelf got me thinking about this with her review of Voyager by Diana Gabeldon, and I completely agree. I want to see more stories about couples who are already together, still having sex, and overcoming obstacles because that's real life, friends. Interesting love stories begin when two people commit to each other forever. More of this please!

The Bromance Book Club is a new novel from Lyssa Kay Adams. Gavin and Thea Scott have been married for three years, are parents to adorable twin girls, and are also going through a pretty rough patch in their marriage. While it's not their only problem, Thea has been faking it in bed for awhile, and let's just say that Gavin doesn't take the news particularly well...

To help him save his marriage, Gavin's friends introduce him to a secret book club where the men read romance novels to help them learn how to be better partners. (Note - this is actually a genius idea, and men should legitimately try it now and then.)

I really liked Gavin, and his renewed energy to keep their family together was so sweet. What I most adored about Gavin was his stutter. My own son has a great vocabulary, but we work on articulation because his speech isn't always clear. On the very day I read this book, my son came home from daycamp and told me someone had made fun of his voice. I loved seeing a hero in a novel with a similar challenge. Thea loves Gavin and his stutter, and it is such an important reminder that our imperfections make us perfect to others.

The Bromance Book Club comes out in November which is perfect timing because, while I wouldn't call this a Christmas romance novel, it is set in the 5 weeks leading up to Christmas. If, like me, you adore romance novels and books about books, The Bromance Book Club will be such a treat to read.

xo
Jenn

Disclaimer - I received a complementary copy of his novel from Penguin Random House Canada for review purposes. All thoughts and opinions are entirely my own.

Monday, 22 July 2019

I Love Indigo For Their Books But Also For Another Reason

I love Indigo. I'm a bookworm, so it makes a certain degree of sense that I love a store full of knowledge and stories, but there's another reason I love this store. I rarely walk into an Indigo without thinking of one, special memory.




Picture a tired, nervous mama. Her new baby is exactly two-weeks-old. She is faced with a full year ahead at home caring for this baby, and she has made herself a vow, "We must leave the house once a day."

That was me. I loved our little baby, but it was spring and sunny and warm and, most importantly, I knew I'd go crazy if we stayed inside all day.

Before my son was born, I knew I wanted to breastfeed if I could, but the thought of balancing both a physical book along with a baby while nursing felt comically dangerous to me, so, shortly before Sebastian was born, I asked my husband to pick me up a Kobo on his way home from work. Perfect.

When our son was born, my mom stayed with us for a week or so to help us get settled, but eventually she left and Rob went back to the office. It was just me and a baby. And 8 hours to kill before my husband would be home from work.

I had two goals that day:
1. Keep the baby alive.
2. Get a cover for my Kobo.

I didn't want to take the subway with a newborn, so I clicked Sebastian up in his carseat, and we drove to Indigo (the Bay/Bloor location in Toronto to be exact.) I parked in the underground parking, put Sebastian in his baby wrap, grabbed the diaper bag, and we went into the store.

We didn't stay long, but as I was walking to look at the Kobo covers, I was stopped by another customer. A sweet, elderly woman who asked to peek at Sebastian. She was kind and warm, and made me feel like such a proud mama as she gushed over my baby. (I mean, she was in a bookstore, and book people really are the best people.)

Anyways, we chatted for just a minute, then she went her way, and I went mine. I picked out my Kobo cover, paid for it, and Sebastian and I went home.

Part of me can see how this whole story is a non-event, but it's special to me. It's the first time I ever drove Sebastian anywhere on my own. We got there and back without any disasters which was a huge confidence boost for me as a new mom.

Now, I'm fortunate that my son is just as much of a bookworm as I am. He loves Indigo. To be fair, he loves it for the toys just as much as the books, but still, he is a reader. And he has no idea that our favourite store also represents such a big milestone in my early motherhood days.

xo
Jenn

PS - This is not an ad for Indigo or anything. It's simply a bookish memory that means a lot to me, and I wanted to share it here with you.

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